027: Scared Stiff — The Hidden Emotion Model (Part 5)

027: Scared Stiff — The Hidden Emotion Model (Part 5)

Fabrice launches this Podcast by asking David to remind us about the differences between healthy fear and unhealthy, neurotic anxiety, or an anxiety “disorder” like a phobia, or OCD, and so forth. David explains that negative thoughts, and not events, trigger all our emotions, healthy or unhealthy. However, healthy fear results from negative thoughts that are valid and undistorted, and does not need treatment. For example, if you are walking around Chicago in an area dominated by gangs, you may have the thought, “I could get shot. I better be careful because it’s dangerous here!” Your fear is healthy and can keep you vigilant and alive in a genuinely dangerous situation.

In contrast, neurotic, unhealthy anxiety results from thoughts that contain the same ten cognitive distortions that cause depression, such as All-or-Nothing Thinking, Jumping to Conclusions (e.g. Mind-Reading and Fortune-Telling), Emotional Reasoning, Magnification, Should Statements, and more.

David explains that the Hidden Emotion Model is radically different from CBT, exposure therapy, and most other current treatments for anxiety. The theory behind Hidden Emotion Technique is that “niceness” is the cause of (almost) all anxiety in the United States at this time. In other words, people who are prone to anxiety typically think they have to be nice all the time, and please other people, and not have certain kinds of forbidden feelings, such as anger, or loneliness, or even wanting something you are not supposed to want.

David brings this powerful treatment technique to life with a vignette involving Terry, the woman with ten years of terrifying panic attacks described in previous podcast. When David asked about her very first panic attack, ten years earlier some amazing and illuminating information emerged.

David gives tips on how therapists can use the Hidden Emotion Model,

  1. The hidden emotion or conflict is buried in the present, and not in the past.
  2. It is something very ordinary, such as not liking your job, or your major in college, or a conflict with a friend, family member or colleague.
  3. The anxiety is nearly always a symbolic expression of the feeling or problem the patient is not bringing to conscious awareness. David gives listeners an exercise to see if they can pinpoint the symbolic meaning of Terry’s panic attacks.

Fabrice asks the important question—what do you do when the anxious patient insists that there aren’t any hidden feelings? David explains that most anxious individuals will say that, and describes how to bring the hidden feeling or problem to conscious awareness.

He emphasizes the three things he really likes about the Hidden Emotion Model:

  1. It explains the timing of anxiety attacks, so it has tremendous explanatory power. Freud said that anxiety is the mysterious emotion, that comes out of the blue, and strikes like lightning, without rhyme or reason. David disagrees, and emphasizes that anxiety rarely or never comes from out of the blue.
  2. The Hidden Emotion Model can have powerful and rapid healing effects for patients with every type of anxiety, as well as individuals struggling with hypochondriasis and those who go to medical doctors with complaints of pain, fatigue, or dizziness that does not appear to have a valid medical cause.
  3. The Hidden Emotion Model teaches us that the ultimate cause of most anxiety is the fear of the self, of our emotions and how we genuinely feel as human beings.
  4. The Hidden Emotion Model teaches us that recovery from anxiety does not involve recovery from some “defect” or “mental disorder,” but rather the discovery of what it is like to be human being, with all of our feelings, and that it is okay to have an express those feelings.

Finally, David explains that while this technique traces to the teachings of Freud, Freud might turn over in his grave and find it superficial or silly, since David simply tells anxious patients that they are suppressing or repressing something that’s bothering them, and insists they bring it to conscious awareness right away. David accepts this criticism, but also adds that the Hidden Emotion Technique works and frequently triggers complete recovery with patients who are only partially helped by the skillful use of cognitive techniques and exposure techniques.

However, the “niceness” phenomenon only seems to affect about 75% of anxious patients; sometimes, a phobia is just a phobia, with no hidden feeling or conflict. Those individuals will not be helped by this technique. Fortunately, we have dozens of other powerful techniques that will be curative!

024: Scared Stiff — The Cognitive Model (Part 3)

In this Podcast, David and Fabrice describe cognitive model of anxiety, which is based on three powerful ideas:

  1. Anxiety always results from negative thought (NTs) that involve the prediction of danger. For example, if you have public speaking anxiety, you are probably telling yourself something like this: “I just know I’m going to blow it. My voice will tremble. People will know I’m anxious. My mind will go blank. I’ll mumble and make a total fool of myself.” Or, if you struggle with panic attacks, you probably have thoughts like this: “I think I’m about to die. I can’t breathe properly. I’m about to pass out!” Or, “I’m about to lose control and go crazy.”
  2. The NTs that trigger anxiety are always distorted and illogical. In contrast, valid NTs cause healthy fear.
  3. When you put the lie to the distorted NTs, the anxiety will disappear. This can sometimes happen in an instant.

Dr. Burns describes his treatment of a woman named Terry who had suffered from ten years of incapacitating panic attacks and severe depression prior to contacting Dr. Burns. During each panic attack, Terry would experience tightness in her chest and tingling skin and tell herself she was about to pass out, suffocate, or die of a heart attack. Multiple emergency room visits, medical tests, and reassurances from doctors did not help. In addition, years of medication and psychotherapy were not at all helpful.

After trying a number of cognitive techniques that did not help, Dr. Burns persuaded her to let him induce an actual panic attack during an office visit so he could use the Experimental Technique, which is arguably the most powerful technique ever developed for the treatment of anxiety, and he televised the session. What happened next will blow your mind!

In the next podcast, Drs. Burns and Nye will describe the Exposure Model of treatment, and Dr. Burns will describe his personal struggles with his fear of blood during medical school.

 

→ Click here to download Terri’s Recovery Circle

022: Scared Stiff — What Is Anxiety? (Part 1)

In this Podcast, David and Fabrice answer these questions:

  • What is anxiety?
  • How does it differ from depression?
  • Do anxiety and depression always go hand in hand?
  • How does anxiety differ from healthy fear?
  • What are the most common forms of anxiety?
  • How common is anxiety?

Anxiety, like depression, has been called the world’s oldest con. That’s because you are always fooling yourself, and buying into negative thoughts that aren’t true, when you’re feeling anxious and insecure. Dr. Burns highlights the most common cognitive distortions that trigger anxiety, and discusses the powerful role of shame in anxiety.

In the next several podcasts, Dr. Burns will describe powerful, fast-acting, drug-free treatment methods that can help you defeat every type of anxiety, Including

  • Chronic worrying
  • Phobias
  • Social anxiety
  • Public speaking anxiety
  • Shyness
  • OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder)
  • PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder)
  • Panic attacks
  • Agoraphobia
  • BDD (Body Dysmorphic Disorder)

So stay tuned!