075: Five Simple Ways to Boost Your Happiness–#2: Do Something You’ve Been Putting Off

075: Five Simple Ways to Boost Your Happiness–#2: Do Something You’ve Been Putting Off

Note: I am republishing this because I published it in the wrong category last time. You have likely already received it, and if so, ignore this new version, as it is the same. I apologize for my error! david

Use the Anti-Procrastination Sheet!

This the second of five Feeling Good Podcasts on simple things you can do to boost your happiness. Procrastination is one of the most common causes of unhappiness, and this bad habit is almost universal. We all put off the tasks we dread because they make us anxious, and because we’re tempted to do other things that are way more rewarding. But the longer you procrastinate, the worse you feel, and this robs you of motivation. As a result, you fall into a vicious cycle where procrastination triggers negative feelings like depression, anxiety, and guilt, and your negative feelings, in turn, reduce your motivation and trigger more procrastination. A vicious cycle.

Fabrice and I are going to show you how to break the cycle and boost your happiness. To get started, please think of ONE thing you’ve been procrastinating on. It could be anything, such as working on your taxes, cleaning your garage, filing papers, working on a paper or presentation you’ve been avoiding, reading something you have to read for school or work–anything at all.

Now I want to ask you a question. Would you like to overcome the procrastination so you can get started on that task? If your answer is no, you can come back and listen later when you do want to solve this problem.

If the answer is yes, then I have a second question for you. WHEN would you like to overcome your procrastination and get started? Today? Or later on?

If your answer is today, then we’re ready to rumble. If you say, “tomorrow,” or some later time, then I’d encourage you to come back to this podcast when you are ready to solve the problem. I can ONLY help you overcome your procrastination today! NOT tomorrow.

Finally, I want to know if you’d be willing to devote a very small amount of time to getting started TODAY. I’m asking you to invest something like five minutes, and I’m also asking you to agree to limit your work this small amount of time. This is crucial, because if you tell yourself you have to do the entire job, that may take hours, and you’ll probably feel so overwhelmed that you won’t do a thing!

Finally, I want to know if you’d be willing to get started for five minutes even if you’re not “in the mood,” and even if you’re completely unmotivated, and EVEN if the very thought of the task makes you anxious and guilty. If the answer is YES, then we’ve got a deal. But if you want to wait for the motivation, I urge you to turn off the podcast and come back to it at some later time.

One philosophical principle is the approach we’re going to teach you is NOT to wait for motivation. Most procrastinators think that motivation comes first, followed by productive action, but this is an illusion, because you’ll probably NEVER feel motivated to do some awful task you’ve been putting off. If you’re waiting for motivation, you’ll be waiting forever!

As I wrote in my first book, Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy,  highly productive people know that ACTION comes first, followed by motivation. In other words, you have to get started on some task before you’ll feel motivated. You’re not entitled to feel motivated until you’ve start accomplishing something! Waiting for motivation is the trap that keeps your procrastination alive and prospering.

I’m going to make things simple for you using a tool I created years ago called the Anti-Procrastination Sheet! To make this podcast experiential, think about the specific task you’ve been putting off, like filing papers, preparing your taxes, cleaning the garage, a paper or report you have to prepare–anything at all.

Now take a look at the Anti-Procrastination Sheet. As you can see, it has five vertical columns, but they’re different from the columns on the Pleasure Predicting Sheet that we discussed in last week’s podcast. In the first column you break the task into small, or even tiny, steps, and number them. Make sure that each step can be completed quickly and easily–for example 30 seconds, or a minute or two.

You don’t have to outline the entire task, just the first four or five steps. And make sure the steps are small enough so you can complete all or most of them in five minutes or so. The philosophy behind this is called “little steps for big feats!” If you aim to do just a little, you may end up doing a great deal. But if you aim to do it all at once, the odds are high that you’ll just end up procrastinating, because the task will seem overwhelming.

After you’ve outlined the first few steps, predict how satisfying or rewarding each step will be in the second and third columns, on a scale from 0% (not at all satisfying) to 100% (tremendously satisfying.) Make sure you complete this column before you do the activity. And make sure you do it on paper, and not just in your head!

Now complete the first step, and indicate how satisfying and rewarding it turned out to be on the same scale, from 0% to 100% in the fourth and fifth columns. That’s all there is to it! Now do the same thing for the second step of the task.

You are welcome to print the attached copy and use it personally, but distribution or reproduction electronically is not permitted. Therapists who want to use this and hundreds of other assessment and treatment tools can purchase my Therapist’s Toolkit–you’ll find the order form on my website, www.feellinggood.com.

Now I’ll show you how the Anti-Procrastination Sheet works using a personal example of a task I hate and typically put off–and since this is something that I’m procrastinating on right now, we’ll see if the method works!

The task I’ve selected is listing my business expenses for our annual meeting with the accountant who prepares our taxes. This is something I always put off because it seems hard, boring, and anxiety-provoking.

Throughout the year, I save my receipts in file folders for various types of expenses–mailing expenses, professional entertainment expenses, software expenses, and so forth. So I have to list and total up all the expenses in each category, which involves a lot of busy work. I also have to do some complicated things like downloading our yearly charge card business expenses so I can list them as well, and I also have to download my PayPal receipts for sales of Therapist’s Toolkits and other things I sell on my website. And I nearly always have to call the help lines to figure out how to do the downloading, since I find it a bit complicated and confusing.

Yuck! No fun!

Take a look at my Anti-Procrastination Sheet. As you can see, I listed the first five steps of this task, beginning with something really simple–turning on the computer.  I made sure the next four steps were reasonably quick and easy, too.

Then I predicted how difficult and satisfying the first step would be, on a scale from 0 (not at all difficult or satisfying) to 100 (extremely difficult or satisfying. As you can see,  I did not expect it to be especially difficult or satisfying, since I turn on my computer all the time. But I thought it might be slightly satisfying because I could tell myself, “hey, I just got started!”

Next, I made my difficulty and satisfying predictions for the next four steps. Again, my estimates for the difficulty of each step were fairly low, as were my expectations of satisfaction, as you can see.

Once you’ve listed the first few steps and predicted how difficult and satisfying each step will be, go ahead and complete the first step, and record how satisfying and difficult it turned out to be in the third and fourth columns, on the same scale from 0 to 100. As you can see, my predictions for the first step were fairly accurate. It wasn’t at all difficult, but it was twice as satisfying as I had anticipated.

Then, I got a little boost in my mood–since I was facing the task I’d been putting off–and completed the next four steps, which were surprisingly easy, and somewhat more satisfying than I had predicted, as you can see. I’m sure you’ve heard the old Buddhist proverb that the longest journey begins with a single step–or, if you’re using the Anti-Procrastination Sheet, three or four small steps!

That’s all there is to it! Give it a try and email us to tell us how it worked for you!

Now let’s just suppose you’re not sold on what Fabrice and I have been teaching you in this podcast, and you’re telling yourself, “Oh, this is too hard for me, I just can’t get myself to outline the task on the Anti-Procrastination Sheet.” What should you do then?

Well, I have a suggestion for you, and another cool tool you can use. My suggestion is to stop telling yourself, “I can’t,” because this is not a valid statement. It isn’t true that you CAN’T get yourself to use the Anti-Procrastination Sheet. For example, if I held a gun to your head and told you to outline a task you’ve been putting off, you’d suddenly discover that you CAN do it!

But what is at issue here is that you may not WANT to do get started–for a whole variety of reasons! If that’s where you’re at, I would suggest that you list all the really GOOD reasons NOT to use the Anti-Procrastination Sheet today.

In fact, you may not even want to do that, so Fabrice will do it for you, and you can just look at this list that he and I came up with:

Really GOOD Reasons to Keep Procrastinating

  • Tomorrow will be a better day
  • I need more sleep
  • There’s something really good on TV right now
  • I’m not in the mood
  • I’ve done enough work for the day
  • I need some time to relax
  • It’s not necessary to do it right now
  • It will take too much time
  • It will be too hard
  • It will be too upsetting
  • I have other more important things to do.

Once you’ve complete your lists, or simply reviewed the list that Fabrice and I created for you, I would like to ask you this question: “Given all those many wonderful  advantages and benefits of procrastination, and all the really good reasons NOT to get started right now, why in the world would you want to get started? Your procrastination makes all the sense in the world!”

Oh, I forgot to tell you how my own Anti-Procrastination Sheet worked out for me. Doing the first few steps got me into a flow, and over the next several days, I completed the entire task fairly easily, working a couple hours a day, even without having to outline any more steps on my Anti-Procrastination Sheet. I’m ready for the meeting with our accountant, and my wife informed me that I’m actually a month ahead of schedule. The whole secret was getting started, taking that first small step.

And DID it boost my happiness? Absolutely! I feel relieved, proud,and happy with what I’ve accomplished. That awful chore is no longer a heavy stone I have to carry around on my shoulders all day long! No guilt, either!

Next week, we’ll have another cool and simple tool you can use to boost your happiness–by confronting a fear. You may have a phobia, like the fear of cats or dogs, or heights. Or perhaps you’re shy and fear opening up in groups of people, or maybe you have public speaking anxiety. Since I’ve had and defeated tons of fears in my life, and since I’ve had thousands of therapy sessions with individuals struggling with every conceivable form of anxiety, this is one my favorite topics. I can’t wait to see you at next week’s Feeling Good Podcast!

Fabrice and I hope you enjoy our Feeling Good Podcasts, and also hope you can leave some positive comments for us and some five star ratings if you like what we’re doing!

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At least one listener has had problems leaving an iTunes review from his i-phone, so Fabrice has created some simple to follow instructions if you need help.

 

053: Ask David — “I don’t feel like doing it!” Quick Cure for Procrastinators

053: Ask David — “I don’t feel like doing it!” Quick Cure for Procrastinators

Quick Cure for Procrastinators

In this podcast, David and Fabrice answer a question from a listener named Benjamin on the topic of procrastination. He wrote:

“The live therapy with Marilyn was very interesting – like other listeners, I was impressed by her character and strength.

“Towards the end of this most recent podcast, you were musing on what topics to cover in future podcasts. I would love to hear about how you treat people suffering from chronic laziness (“Do Nothingism”). In particular, there seems to be a strong potential of a Catch-22 with Process Resistance: The patient cannot find the motivation to do anything, yet they have to carry out the process (do the homework) to improve.

“Even worse, in “Feeling Good”, you categorize “Do Nothingism” into around 10 different categories, and suggest a different approach for each one. What should a lazy person do, who identifies with multiple categories, but is already starting to feel overwhelmed at the prospect of doing one of those activities, let alone five of them?

“I would love to hear David’s thoughts on this!”

David and Fabrice begin by thanking Benjamin, and David emphasizes how helpful and inspiring it is to receive specific questions like this, which makes it easy to create a (hopefully) informative and interesting podcast.

David says that his thinking about the treatment of procrastination has changed greatly since he wrote Feeling Good. One big change is that he no longer tries to “help” individuals who procrastinate, since this will cause them to continue to procrastinate, and the failure will now be the failure of the therapist, who’s “helping” wasn’t good enough.

Instead, David outlines a multi-step approach, based on someone who has ten years of unfiled papers that have piled up in his office, so that by now 15 feet of desk space is completely covered by piles of papers roughly one foot high. Fabrice plays the role of the resistant patient, and David plays the role of the therapist.

The steps include:

Paradoxical Agenda Setting: David asks, “The procrastination seems to be working for you. Why would you want to change? Let’s make a list of all the benefits of procrastination, and all the reasons NOT to change.” David emphasizes that the patient has to convince the therapist that this is something he really does want to change. It’s NOT the therapist’s role to help or to convince the patient to change!

Miracle Cure Question: What kind of help would you like in today’s session? Most patients say they need help with motivation. David declines to offer this, explaining that it isn’t on the therapeutic menu today—only the “Blue Plate Special!” The patient must agree to begin working on the filing in spite of having no motivation.

David also explains the underlying concept behind this strategy: most procrastinators are waiting for motivation, but that never works. You’ll be waiting forever, because you’re NEVER going to feel like doing all that filing! You aren’t entitled to motivation!

Productive individuals know that action comes first, and motivation comes second.

Specificity: What time would you like my help in overcoming your procrastination? The patient’s requests for help yesterday or tomorrow are declined by the therapist, so they settle on 6 PM today.

Little Steps for Big Feats: Let’s list the first five things you would need to do tonight at 6 PM, making sure that every step can be completed in 15 to 30 seconds. They list these steps:

  1. Walk into my office
  2. Choose one pile to start working on
  3. Pick up the top piece of paper on the pile
  4. Put it into a blank manila file folder
  5. Label the file folder

Let’s Be Specific: David asks if Fabrice needs help with Step 1? Step 2? Etc. Fabrice finally admits he can do these five steps.

Five Minute Rule: David asks if Fabrice will agree to do these five steps between 6 PM and 6:05 PM, and if he will agree to work on his filing for ONLY those five minutes. At the end of the five minutes he has completed 100% of the assignment. The rationale is that if Fabrice tries to do it all, he’ll get so overwhelmed that he won’t do anything. But if he agrees to ONLY five minutes, that will be do-able. And if he surprises himself, and gets motivated to do more, he can, be he only gets credit for the first five minutes.

Problem – Solution List: David asks Fabrice to put a line down the middle of a piece of paper, from top to bottom, and list all the problems that will get in the way at 6 PM, and then to list convincing solutions to each problem in the right-hand column. Fabrice lists two problems: 1. I won’t feel like it. And 2. Traffic might be heavy, so I might not get home by 6 PM.

“I Stubbornly Refused” Technique: David asks Fabrice to agree to an unusual phone call at 6:05 PM!

TIC – TOC Technique: David plays the role of Fabrice’s “Task-Interfering Cognitions” (TICS) that will tempt him to procrastinate, and asks Fabrice to play the role of the “Task-Oriented Cognitions” (TOCS) he can use to combat the TOCs. The TICS include the familiar ones such as:

  1. Five minutes won’t help, the job is overwhelming.
  2. Even if I get started, I’ll just relapse, so there will never be a permanent solution.
  3. It’s not such a big problem, I don’t need to do my filing now.
  4. I can watch Game of Thrones on TV instead. That will be more fun.
  5. It will be too anxiety provoking to get started.
  6. It’s too late to get started anyway.
  7. Tomorrow will be a better day.

David confesses the problem is one that he actually had, and describes how he solved it, using this exact approach!

If you are reading this blog on social media, I appreciate it! I would like to invite you to visit my website, http://www.FeelingGood.com, as well. There you will find a wealth of free goodies, including my Feeling Good blogs, my Feeling Good Podcasts with host, Dr. Fabrice Nye, and the Ask Dr. David blogs as well, along with announcements of upcoming workshops, and tons of resources for mental health professionals as well as patients!

Once you link to my blog, you can sign up using the widget at the top of the column to the right of each page. Please forward my blogs to friends as well, especially anyone with an interest in mood problems, psychotherapy, or relationship conflicts.

Thanks! David

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047: Tools… not Schools of Therapy

Tools… not Schools of Therapy

Fabrice asks David about the title of his TEAM-CBT eBook for therapists—Tools, Not Schools, of Therapy. David explains that the field of psychotherapy is dominated by numerous schools of therapy that compete like religions, or even cults, each claiming to have the answer to emotional suffering. So you’ve got the psychodynamic school, and the psychoanalytic school, the Adlerian school, the Beckian cognitive therapy school, the Jungian school, and tons more, including EMDR, behavior therapy, humanistic therapy, ACT, TMT, EMT, and so forth. Wikipedia lists more than 50 major schools of psychotherapy, but there are way more than that, as new schools emerge almost on a weekly basis.

David describes several conversations with the late Dr. Albert Ellis, who argued that most schools of therapy were started by narcissistic and emotionally disturbed individuals. Ellis claimed that most were self-promoting, dishonest individuals who claimed to know the true “causes” of emotional distress and insisted they had the “best” treatment methods. And yet, research almost never supports these claims.

David, who is a medical doctor, points out that we don’t have competing schools of medicine. Can you imagine what it would be like if we did? Let’s say you broke your leg, and went to a doctor who prescribes penicillin. You ask why he’s prescribing penicillin for a broken leg, and he explains that he’s a member of the penicillin school. He says he always prescribes penicillin—it’s good for whatever ails you!

That would be like an Alice in Wonderland world. And yet, that’s precisely how psychiatry and psychotherapy are currently set up. If you’re depressed and you go to a psychiatrist, you’ll be treated with pills. If you go to a psychoanalytic therapist, you’ll get psychoanalysis. Or if you go to a practitioner of EMDR, TFT, or Rational Emotive Therapy (RET), you’ll get EMDR, TFT, or RET. David argues that this just doesn’t make sense.

David argues that the fields needs to move from competing schools of therapy to a new, science-based, data-driven psychotherapy. He emphasizes that we’ve learned a lot from most of the schools of therapy, and that many have provided us with valuable insights about human nature as well as some useful treatment techniques. But now it’s time to move on, leaving all the schools of therapy behind. David acknowledges that this message may seem harsh or upsetting to some listeners, and apologizes for that ahead of time.

David and Fabrice also discuss the spiritual basis of effective psychotherapy, and David describes the reaction of his father, a Lutheran minister, on the day that David was born, as well as a tip his mother gave him when he was in third grade.

In the next Feeling Good Podcast, David and Fabrice will describe Relapse Prevention Training, since the likelihood of relapse after successful treatment is 100%. But if the patient knows what to do, the relapse doesn’t have to be a problem.

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035: Live Session (Mark) — Final Testing, Wrap Up (Part 7)

035: Live Session (Mark) — Final Testing, Wrap Up (Part 7)

Part 7: T = Testing Revisited, Conclusion of the Live Therapy Session with Mark

This is the last live therapy podcast with Mark, the physician who was convinced he was a failure as a father because of his difficulties forming a close, loving relationship with his oldest son. Although the session appeared to go well, we can’t be sure until we see Mark’s end of session mood ratings on the Daily Mood Log and on the Brief Mood Survey and and Evaluation of Therapy Session. David emphasizes that therapists’ perceptions of patients are notoriously inaccurate, but most therapists are unaware of this because they don’t use the rigorous testing procedures at the start and end of sessions.

To review Mark’s partially completed Daily Mood Log, CLICK HERE. Jill and David will ask him to complete the additional negative thoughts on his own after the session.

To review mark’s end of session Brief Mood Survey and Evaluation of Therapy Session, CLICK HERE.

After David review’s the phenomenal changes Mark reported from the start to the end of the session, David asks if the ratings were genuine, or, as some listeners might suspect, faked in order to try to please the therapists. Mark bursts into tears and says, in a choked voice, that it was a life-changing experience.

After the end of the session, David and Fabrice discuss a number of highlights from the work with Mark:

  • The testing indicated a complete or near-complete elimination of symptoms. In 2 ½ hours, Jill and David have essentially completed an entire course of psychotherapy. Although there may still be some work to be done with Mark, the hard part has already been completed.
  • David emphasizes that he now views psychotherapy as a procedure to be done at one sitting, much like surgery, with brief follow-up visits, rather than a long, drawn out procedure meeting once pre week for months or even many years. And although a single 2 or 2 1/2 hour session may be more costly than a traditional 50-minute hour, it can be vastly more cost-effective Than dozens of sessions with little or no progress. In addition, it is vastly better for the patient who walks out feeling good today, rather than having to endure weeks, months, or even many years of traditional talk therapy or antidepressant drug therapy.
  • David and Fabrice talk about the fact that no one is permitted to feel happy all the time, and that Mark’s negative thoughts and feelings WILL return, David defines a “relapse” as one minute or more of feeling lousy. Given that definition, we will ALL relapse forever! But it doesn’t have to be a problem for Mark if he is prepared for this, and knows how to pop out of the relapses quickly, rather than getting stuck in them. This is where Relapse Prevention Training (RPT) becomes so important following the initial dramatic recovery. RPT only takes about 30 minutes and is easy to learn, and will perhaps be the topic for a future Feeling Good Podcast if our listeners express an interest in it.
  • David discusses the difference between an Internal Solution and an External Solution. In this session, David and Jill have guided Mark in the Internal Solution—this means crushing the negative thoughts that triggered Mark’s feelings of unhappiness, anxiety, shame, failure, and anger for years, if not decades. Now that he is feeling so much better about himself, he may want some help with the External Solution. This will involve learning how to develop a more loving relationship with his son using tools like the Relationship Journal and the Five Secrets of Effective Communication. This will be far easier now that Mark is no longer using up all his energy beating up on himself and feeling depressed and inadequate.
  • David wraps up by talking about the true wealth we have as therapists. Although we won’t develop the riches of a Bill Gates doing psychotherapy, we do have the fabulous and precious opportunity to see people as they really are inside, and to witness miracles like the one we saw in the session with Mark.
  • David expresses the hope that listeners have benefitted by listening. Although we are all different, most of us have had the painful experience, like Mark, of believing we were somehow failures, or inferior, or defective, or simply not good enough. We are deeply indebted to Mark’ courage and generosity in giving us the opportunity to see the solution to this ancient and almost universal human problem!

There are many resources for listeners who want to learn more about TEAM-CBT, including:

  • David’s exciting two-day and four-day training workshops, listed on his website, feelinggood.com.
  • Tons of free resources for patients and therapists at feelinggood.com. Please sign up using the widget in the upper right hand corner of any page on his website and you will receive email notifications and links to every post.
  • David’s psychotherapy eBook entitled Tools, Not Schools of Therapy.
  • David’s Tuesday psychotherapy training groups at Stanford, which are co-led Jill Levitt, PhD and Helen Yeni-Komshian, MD. The training is free of charge to Bay Area and northern California therapists. You will have the chance to do free personal work, too!
  • David’s famous Sunday hikes, also free to members of the training groups.
  • Paid online and in-person weekly TEAM-CBT training groups, plus intensive TEAM-CBT treatment programs, at the Feeling Good Institute in Mt. View California.
  • In addition, many TEAM-CBT training and treatment programs are now offered in many cities throughout the US and Canada. For more information, visit feelinggood.com or www.feelinggoodinstitute.com.
031: Live Session (Mark) — Agenda Setting Phase (Part 3)

031: Live Session (Mark) — Agenda Setting Phase (Part 3)

Part 3—A = Paradoxical Agenda Setting (PAS), Initial Segment

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In the early days of my career, I (Dr. Burns) would have assumed that Mark definitely wanted to change–after all, he’d been in a lot of pain for a long time, and he came to the session because he wanted help. So, following the empathy phase of the session, I would have jumped in with a variety of cognitive therapy techniques to help Mark challenge his Negative Thoughts, such as “I’ve been a failure as a father,” or “my brain is defective.” Although this might have been effective, there’s a good chance that it might not have worked. That’s because Mark might have “yes-butted” me or insisted that he really was a failure and that I just wasn’t “getting it.”

In fact, the attempt to help the patient without first dealing with the patient’s resistance is the cause of nearly all therapeutic failure. But most therapists make this mistake over and over–and don’t realize that their well-intentioned efforts to help actually trigger and reinforce the patient’s resistance.

Instead, TEAM Therapists use a number of Paradoxical Agenda Setting (PAS) techniques designed to bring the patient’s subconscious resistance to conscious awareness. Then we melt the resistance away before attempting to change the way the patient is thinking and feeling. I (DB) have developed 15 or 20 PAS techniques, and Jill and I  used several of them in our session with Mark:

  • The Invitation Step
  • The Miracle Cure Question
  • The Magic Button
  • Positive Reframing
  • The Acid Test
  • The Magic Dial

When Jill and I use Positive Reframing, we are hoping that Mark will make an unexpected discovery–that his negative thoughts and feelings, such as his sadness, shame, discouragement, and inadequacy actually reflect his core values and show what a positive, awesome human being he is. In other words, he will discover that his core values are actually the source of his symptoms as well as his resistance to change.

This approach represents a radical departure from the way many psychiatrists and psychologists think about psychiatric symptoms as well as resistance.  When I was a psychiatric resident, I (DB) was trained to think about resistance as something negative. For example, we may tell ourselves that resistant patients cling to their feelings of depression and worthlessness because they want attention, because they want to feel sorry for themselves, because they fear change, or because they are afraid will lose their identity if they recover. While there’s some truth in these formulations, they may not be helpful because they tend to cast the patient in a negative light, as if their symptoms and their resistance to change were somehow bad, or childish, or based on some kind of chemical imbalance in their brains. As you will see, the TEAM-CBT approach approaches resistance is radically different manner.

We will give you the chance to pause the podcast briefly and try your own hand at Positive Reframing before you hear it live during the session. Specifically, we will ask you to review Mark’s Daily Mood Log, and ask yourself these two questions about each of his negative thoughts and feelings:

  • What does this negative thought or feeling show about Mark that is beautiful, positive, and awesome?
  • What are some benefits, or advantages, of this negative thought or feeling? Are there some ways that this thought or feeling is helping Mark?

As you so this, make a list of as many Positives as you can on a piece of paper. See what you can come up with.

I want to warn you that it may be difficult to come up with your list of Positives at first. If so, this is good, because when you hear the next podcast, you’ll have many “ah ha!” moments and it will all become quite obvious to you. Then you will have a new and deeper understanding of resistance–an understanding that can help you greatly if you are a therapist or if you are struggling with your own feelings of depression and anxiety.

Jill gives a great overview of why the paradoxical approach is necessary during the Paradoxical Agenda Setting phase of the session.

To learn more about Paradoxical Agenda Setting, you can read David’s featured article in the March / April 2017 issue of Psychotherapy Networker entitled “When Helping Doesn’t Help.” You will see how he helped a woman struggling with intense depression, anxiety and rage due to decades of horrific domestic rape and violence.

 

028: Scared Stiff — The Motivational Model (Part 6)

028: Scared Stiff — The Motivational Model (Part 6)

In this Podcast, David and Fabrice discuss the fourth powerful model in the treatment of anxiety—the Motivational Model. The key here is bringing the patient’s subconscious resistance to conscious awareness, and melting it away with paradoxical techniques. This is absolutely critical if you are hoping to see a complete elimination of symptoms in any type of anxiety.

You may recall that the Outcome Resistance for anxiety disorders usually results Magical Thinking—the anxious patient may be suffering intensely and asking for help, but secretly believes that something terrible will happen if the treatment is successful and the anxiety disappears. In other words, most anxious individuals are convinced that the anxiety is protecting him or her from some catastrophic event.

David brings this concept to life with a dramatic description of his treatment of a young man named Sam who’d been struggling with intense PTSD—Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder— for six months following a traumatic interaction with two sadistic gunmen.

David and Fabrice also discuss metaphors for understanding how healing actually occurs. Most therapists think of depression and anxiety as mountains that have evolved slowly, over years or decades. They sometimes also believe that treatment and recovery will also requires years and years of treatment, with very slow progress. Of course, if the therapist and patient believe this it will function as a self-fulfilling prophecy.

In sharp contrast, David describes a new way to think about recovery, as something extremely rapid, a personal transformation that happens suddenly, within a very brief time period within a therapy session. But this remarkable phenomenon is only possible when the patient’s resistance to change has been skillfully and compassionately addressed by the therapist. At that point, the patient and therapist are on the same TEAM, working together collaboratively. Then, amazing changes can often unfold quickly.

Plans for future Feeling Good Podcasts will include a series of fascinating podcasts that will feature an actual live therapy session, with David and his colleague, Dr. Jill Levitt, acting as co-therapists, including commentaries on how each step of T.E.A.M. is being implemented. This will give you the unique opportunity to look behind closed doors so you can observe actual healing taking place.

In addition, a future “Ask David” podcast is planned, as well as a podcast on “The Truth about Benzodiazepines,” plus podcasts featuring more treatment methods for anxiety such as Interpersonal Exposure Techniques and Cognitive Flooding. Dr. Burns also promises a fascinating Feeling Good Podcast on the use of the Five Secrets of Effective Communication with violent individuals who are threatening, hostile, and dangerous.

025: Ask David — How do you handle a patient you don’t like (or who bores you)?

In this Podcast, David answers two intriguing questions posed by listeners, and one question posed by his host and colleague Dr. Fabrice Nye.

  1. How do you deal with a patient (or friend) who is boring? David describes a technique he learned from a mentor, Dr. Myles Weber, during his second year of psychiatric residency at Highland Hospital in Oakland. The technique works instantly 100% of the time, and is guaranteed to make any boring interaction with any patient instantly exciting! David and Fabrice emphasize that the same technique can be used with a friend, colleague, or loved one who seems boring, including someone you are dating and can’t seem to connect with at anything other than a superficial level.David also describes powerful, shocking and illuminating experiences he had when attending psychodrama marathons sponsored by the Human Institute in Palo Alto during his medical school years, and what he learned about the differences between the off-putting “outer” selves we display to others and the more genuine “inner” selves we often try to hide.
  2. How do you deal with a patient (or friend) you don’t like? David describes a method he always used with patients he didn’t like, including one who he found intensely offensive—even disgusting. He explains that the patients he disliked the most almost always became the ones he liked the most, and ended up feeling the closest to, once he used this radical technique. The technique can also be effective with friends or colleagues you’re at odds with.Fabrice reminds us that the approaches David describes in this podcast involve several of the Five Secrets of Effective Communication discussed in previous podcasts. He warns us that they require considerable training, skill and practice, and are likely to backfire if done crudely.
  3. How do you get patients to do their psychotherapy homework? Every therapist who assigns psychotherapy homework is keenly aware that many patients, perhaps most, “forget” or simply refuse to do the homework. And these are the patients who don’t improve much, if at all. Dr. Burns explains how he tried dozens of techniques that didn’t work early in his career, and finally discovered an approach that was almost always effective.
Overcoming Resistance for Rapid Recovery

Overcoming Resistance for Rapid Recovery

Comment: Hi Dr. Burns,

I’ve read your book Feeling Good and it helped me greatly really and I want to thank you for that book. And now I just saw one of your interviews about TEAM-CBT and even just reading the case and applying the methods on myself helped me even more! Seeing the symptoms not as defects but some kind of a self-defense system makes sense and this lets your subconscious accept the help immediately.

I wonder if you are planning to publish another self-help book about TEAM-CBT.

I believe this invention can change the psychiatry world. Thank you for your great works.

Kerem

Hi Kerem,

You got it. Thanks! I am excited that my message is starting to get through. I am thinking seriously about a new book, and trying to think of a title.

Yes, I agree, the Invitation Step, and in fact the many Paradoxical Agenda Setting tools I have developed have the potential to revolutionize psychiatric and psychological treatment. I am trying to get the word out, and trying to learn more about how to use my posts and other accounts to connect with folks.

David

PS I want to remind web visitors that you can click the Sharing button if you want to share any of my posts with your friends.

023: Scared Stiff — What Causes Anxiety? What’s the Cure? (Part 2)

In this Podcast, David and Fabrice describe four powerful treatment models for anxiety, including

  • The Cognitive Model
  • The Exposure Model
  • The Motivational Model
  • The Hidden Emotion Model

Each approach has a completely different theory about the causes of anxiety and utilizes completely different treatment techniques. For example, cognitive therapists believe that distorted thoughts trigger all anxiety, and that the most effective treatment involves challenging these distortions. In contrast, exposure therapists argue that avoidance is the cause of all anxiety, and that exposure is the only effective treatment. Those who adhere to the Motivational Model emphasize the role of resistance. In other words, anxious individuals are reluctant to let go of the anxiety because they secretly believe that the anxiety will protect them from danger.  And those who adhere to the Hidden Emotion Model claim that “niceness” is the true cause of all anxiety in the United States at this time, and that hidden problems and feelings may need to be brought to conscious awareness before the patient can recover.

Dr. Burns argues that, in fact, all four theories are correct, and that if you skillfully integrate all four approaches, you will often see a rapid and total elimination of anxiety in the great majority of your patients.

Dr. Burns describes how he created the Hidden Emotion Model when he was treating a woman with mysterious and intractable case of Panic Disorder. Every time her boss walked past her desk, she became nauseous and panicky, and had the overwhelming urge to vomit on him. Then she would have to rush to the ladies’ room to rest until the nausea and panic diminished, and she sometimes had to go home because the symptoms were so severe. This was all the more puzzling because she insisted she had the best boss in the world and that there were no problems at work. She explained that her boss constantly praised her and gave her promotions and generous raises, and that she had no complaints whatsoever.

Cognitive and exposure techniques were only partially effective, until an unexpected discovery suddenly emerged during a therapy session that led to a surprising outcome. What do you think the hidden emotion was? Tune in and you’ll find out!

In the next several podcasts, Drs. Burns and Nye will bring these four models to life, using real life examples, including some of Drs. Burns’ personal struggles with anxiety early in his career.

019: Ask David — The Defiant Child: A Secret All Parents Should Know

In this short podcast, David and Fabrice address a question submitted by a listener who benefitted from his book, Feeling Good Together. She wants to know whether the same EAR techniques described in that book could help her deal more effectively with a defiant, oppositional child. Dr. Burns reveals a fantastically helpful secret that he and his wife stumbled across in raising their own children. If you have ever struggled in your attempts to deal with an oppositional child or adolescent, you will find this podcast enlightening!