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109: David’s Top 10 List!

109: David’s Top 10 List!

A fan named Tanuj asked:

“I’ve heard Dr. Burns mention that he is most proud of a few of the techniques he’s developed, and he mentioned that the Disarming Technique would be near the top of the list. I believe he said there were three or five of them. I was wondering what the others were. Does he have a top 5?”

Thank you, Tanuj. I got to thinking and actually came up with 10. Fabrice and I will briefly discuss each one on today’s podcast. So here they are!

  1. The list of Ten Cognitive Distortions that I created for my first book, Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy. This list has been reproduced enormous numbers of times in the media and has been translated into more than 30 languages.
  2. The Disarming Technique and Law of Opposites. This means that you can nearly always put the lie to a criticism by finding the truth in it. However, this can be difficult because it requires the death of the ego, or self, the so-called “Great Death” that the Buddhists have emphasized as a key to enlightenment. This method has transformed my clinical practice and personal life and has been very helpful to many of my patients as well. However, it is not easy to learn, in part because it does involve the death of the “self.”
  3. The Externalization of Voices plus Acceptance Paradox. This was one of the first cognitive therapy techniques I developed, and I have used it more than any other technique during my career. It’s totally mind-blowing.
  4. The two classic Uncovering Techniques: the Individual and Interpersonal Downward Arrow. You can use these techniques to quickly pinpoint the Self-Defeating Beliefs that trigger painful mood swings, such as Perfectionism, Perceived Perfectionism, the Love Addiction, and Brushfire Fallacy, and more.
  5. The Feared Fantasy and Acceptance Paradox. This is a powerful and innovative exposure technique that can help people overcome the fear of being judged or rejected. It can also help people modify Self-Defeating Beliefs like Perfectionism and the Achievement Addiction, and the Approval Addiction.
  6. The Experimental Technique for extremely rapid treatment of patients with Panic Attacks. With this technique, you can sometimes—often—cure Panic Disorder in a single session. But this requires great courage on the part of the therapist and patient, and a great therapeutic alliance with lots of trust.
  7. My published research with colleagues in the mid-1970s did not support the popular notion that depression results from a chemical imbalance in the brain. In other words, we found that depression probably does NOT result from a deficient of the neurotransmitter, serotonin. Although we published this research in the top psychiatric journal, it was largely ignored for 25 years because people were so hooked on the “chemical imbalance” theory of depression. Now the study has been quoted frequently, and most neuro-scientists no longer give that theory a great deal of credibility.
  8. Brief Mood Survey. I believe I was the first, or one of the first, therapists in the world to require testing of every patient at every treatment session. I started with the Beck Depression Inventory, but have since developed briefer and more accurate scales that patients can complete in the waiting room before and after every sessions. These scales indicate the severity of symptoms such as depression, anxiety, anger, suicidal urges, positive feelings, and relationship satisfaction or conflict. Patients also rate therapist empathy and helpfulness after each session. This simple procedure has revolutionized treatment, because therapists can now see, for the first time, how effective, or ineffective, they are in every single therapy session. The testing has also made data-driven, science-based psychotherapy possible. However, it requires courage on the part of the therapist because the information will often be surprising to the therapist, and disturbing!
  9. Positive Reframing, and all of the new, paradoxical Agenda Setting techniques have made super-high-speed TEAM-CBT treatment methods possible. I now see recovery at speeds I would have thought impossible 20 years ago.
  1. The use of extended, two-hour therapy sessions rather than weekly 50-minute sessions has also been huge. That’s because I often see a complete elimination of symptoms of depression and anxiety in a single extended session of TEAM-CBT, as opposed to months or even years of conventional treatment. Many of my students are reporting similar results. This,  I think, is truly revolutionary!

Well, that’s it. That’s what I’m the most proud of! I suppose I could also include my first book, Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy, which has sold more than 5 million copies worldwide, and has helped many people recover, as well as the development of TEAM-CBT.
Thank you again for your question, and please accept my apology if I am bragging too much, which can be really offensive. However, my mother once said, “If you don’t toot your own horn, no one else is going to toot it for you,” so hopefully the podcast and write-up will be okay.

David

Subscribe

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Coming Soon!
October / November / December 2018–
Cool Workshops for You!

TEAM-CBT Methods for the Treatment of Relationship Difficulties

Step by Step Training for Therapists

by David Burns, MD and Jill Levitt, PhD

Sunday October 28th, 2018 (9 am-4 pm PST)

Live in Palo Alto plus online streaming

Learn how to reduce patient resistance and boost motivation to change. Master skills that will enhance communication skills and increase intimacy with loved ones. This workshop will be highly interactive with many case examples and opportunities for practice using role plays.

Join us for a day of fun and inspiring learning on site in Palo Alto
OR online from anywhere in the world.

Learn from David and Jill–a dynamic teaching duo!

6 CE*s. $135

To register, go to the Feeling Good Institute

or call  650-353-6544

* * *

Rapid Recovery from Trauma

a two-day workshop

by David D. Burns, MD

October 4-5, 2018–Pasadena, CA

and

November 1-2, 2018–Woodland Hills, CA

The November workshop includes Live Streaming
if you cannot attend in person)

For further information, go to www.IAHB.org
or call 1-800-258-8411

Register Now!

* * *

TREAT ANXIETY FAST–
Powerful, Fast-Acting, Drug-Free Treatment Techniques
that Defeat Anxiety & Worry

a 2-day workshop by David D. Burns, MD

November 29 and 30, 2018–San Francisco, CA (in person only)

and

December 3 and 4, Portland, Oregon (in person and live streaming)

PESI is proud to offer an exciting workshop by David Burns, M.D., a pioneer in the development of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Achieve rapid and lasting recovery with all your anxious clients, just as Dr. Burns has done in over 35,000 therapy sessions with severely troubled clients. Become skilled at treating every type of anxiety without drugs.

In this unique 2-day certificate course you’ll master more than 20 treatment techniques to help your clients eliminate the symptoms of anxiety quickly – even your most challenging, resistant clients.

Dr. Burns will illustrate concrete strategies that provide rapid, complete recovery and lasting change for your patients. You’ll learn…

  • How to integrate four powerful treatment models to eliminate symptoms.
  • How to enhance your client’s engagement in therapy.
  • How to develop a treatment plan that specifically targets each client’s unique problems and needs.
  • …and so much more!

David will provide you with guided instruction and share powerful video sessions that capture the actual moment of recovery. You will take away practical strategies to use immediately with any anxious client. Leave this certificate course armed with tools you can use in your very next session!

Don’t miss this opportunity to learn from one of America’s most highly acclaimed psychiatrists and teachers!

Sponsored by PESI

To register, or for more information, call: 800-844-8260

Solution to David’s Tuesday Tip #13*

Solution to David’s Tuesday Tip #13*

This was yesterday’s paradoxical tip of the day!

Some people think that therapy consists of codependent schmoozing behind
closed doors, with the occasional bit of “advice” or “tell me more” thrown in.
Are they right?

Hi everybody,

I am trying, perhaps without complete success, to say this politely, without enraging anybody too much . . . . but

I am sad to say that I think this Tuesday comment is somewhat correct. Many therapists just talk with patients for months or years without much change, often without specific goals, and without measuring anything from session to session to document change, or the lack of change. When I was a psychiatric resident, this type of treatment actually had a name. It was called “supportive emotive therapy.” The patient talks, the therapist listens and provides support, and encourages the outpouring of emotion at times.

Some experts claim that this type of therapy provides a “corrective emotional experience.” The idea is that the relationship with the therapist will correct some shortcoming or void in the patient because of his or her childhood and lack of support and nurture while growing up.

I’m not convinced this non-directive approach corrects much, if anything. In addition, while I know I have lots of helpful techniques to offer, and some reasonably good empathy, I’m not convinced that a relationship with me will ever correct much of anything, to be honest! I’m quite surprised, actually, that so many individuals–colleagues, clients, and students–are even willing to put up with me.

I can be, to be honest, kind of annoying and difficult at times. I don’t see myself as a “corrective emotional experience” much of the time!

I favor therapy that works rapidly, with specific goals and changes that can be documented by assessments of the patient’s feelings at the start and end of every session. This includes testing feelings of depression, suicidal urges, anxiety, and anger,as well as the patient’s feelings of satisfaction with his or her spouse or partner. The assessment of the therapist’s empathy and helpfulness by the patient after every session is also invaluable and, to my way of thinking, mandatory.

While skillful listening will always be an important part of therapy, it will rarely or never be sufficient to help a patient recover from severe depression, or any anxiety disorder, or a troubled marriage, or a habit or addiction. Much more is required, including specific techniques to help the patient change his or her life, as well as resistance-melting techniques to boost the patient’s motivation and collaboration.

Patient homework between sessions will also be a must, in my opinion. You cannot, for the most part, change your life or learn new skills without practice, any more than you could learn tennis or how to play the piano without practice between lessons with your coach or teacher.

All human beings are corruptible, and we all have a kind of inherently lazy streak. So if a therapist has a full-fee private patient, and the patient just wants to schmooze and vent every week for months or years, without being accountable and without doing psychotherapy homework, the therapist will have a guaranteed income and an easy job, since there isn’t a whole lot the therapist has to learn in order to provide this type of non-specific talk therapy, or if you prefer, “non-treatment.”

I apologize deeply if my skeptical / cynical streak is showing, but I sincerely believe our field is in need of reform, and I am saddened and sometimes frustrated, even angered, by the overall poor skill level among mental health professionals.

On the positive side, last week’s intensive in Whistler, Canada was just awesome. Oops, Lisa Kelley has urged me not to go over the top with language, so let me say it was a bit above average. In fact, the ratings for all four days were the highest I’ve received–by a big margin, actually–in the last 25 years or more of doing workshops. I was thrilled and grateful to have such a warm and responsive group.

My dear colleague, Jack Hirose, who organized the conference, said the ratings were also the highest he has seen in the many hundreds of workshops he has sponsored in Canada. I was helped by my dear colleague, Mike Christensen, who attended and assisted with the teaching. Mike was also my co-therapist in the live demonstration with an audience volunteer who had experienced severe trauma and abuse.

Working with her was an inspiring and riveting experience. We were fortunate to due a high definition video of the session, and I hope it will be available for some type of teaching program for you.

If you would like to attend a similar conference, consider my upcoming San Francisco intensive in a few weeks. I will try my hardest to make it a little above average, too! See the details below.

Thanks!

David

* Copyright © 2018 by David D. Burns, MD.

 * * *

Hey, folks, my San Francisco summer intensive will start in a few weeks. it is always one of my BEST training programs of the year. The group will be quite small, giving you lots of chances for Q and A and personal connection with me, plus networking with your colleagues. In addition, many individuals from my Tuesday group at Stanford will join me to provide feedback for you during the small group exercises.

Here are the specifics:

Coming in San Francisco in August

High Speed, Drug Free Treatment of Depression and Anxiety Disorders–
A Four-Day TEAM-CBT Advanced Intensive

August 6 – 9, 2018, South San Francisco Conference Center, California
For more information, click here
or contact http://www.iahb.org/
phone: 800-258-8411

If you can only attend one of my workshops, consider this intensive! it is simplly

THE BEST!

Seating is limited. Register now  if you want to get in on the action!

Hope to see you in San Francisco in August! David

 * * *

Also coming up soon on David’s Sunday FB Live Broadcasts

Sunday, July 15th, 2018, at 3 PM: The Disarming Technique–Taking a Deeper Dive, with special guest, Mike Christensen

Sunday, July 22nd, 2018, at 3 PM: The Shouldy Approach to Life–How to Crush Should Statements, with special guest, Jill Levitt, PhD

If you attend live, you can ask questions and be a part of the show. However, they are all recorded so you can tune in anytime on my Public FB page!

Solution to David’s Tuesday Tip #12*

Solution to David’s Tuesday Tip #12*

This was yesterday’s paradoxical tip of the day!

Successful treatment requires the death of the therapist’s ego;
recovery requires the death of the patient’s ego.

Sorry to be super brief again today because I am currently in Canada on the second day of the four-day intensive. If you missed it this year, you can find an announcement for the annual San Francisco intensive at the bottom of this blog! It’s coming up in August so you still have time to register.

So, what’s the solution to yesterday’s puzzle?

One of the unique features of TEAM-CBT is that patients rate therapists in the waiting room immediately after the session is over, using the Brief Mood Survey and Evaluation of Therapy Session forms. Patients leave the completed surveys before they go home. This gives the therapist the chance to review the ratings when the session is still fresh in the therapist’s mind so he or she can find out how effective, or ineffective, the session was.

The Empathy and Helpfulness scales are extremely sensitive to the smallest errors or failures of the alliance, and most therapists will get failing grades from most of their patients when they first start to use the Brief Mood Survey and Evaluation of Therapy Session. This can be painful, as it bursts the therapist’s bubble of optimism and self-confidence.

But if you, the therapist, process the information with your patient at the start of the next session in the spirit of humility, warmth, and curiosity, it can have a tremendously beneficial effect on the treatment. I’ve experienced this amazing phenomenon more times than I can remember! But it can be very painful to have to face your errors and shortcomings. That’s because the patient’s criticisms of the therapist will always contain, not just a grain of truth, but a whole lot of truth!

Yikes! That sucks!

So, the death of the therapist’s ego will often be required. This, to me, is a good thing, because it gives therapists tremendous opportunities to grow and learn at the same time that their patients are growing and learning. But the negative feedback does hurt at times. And the pain can be fairly intense.

For the patient to recover, the death of the ego may also be required. A great deal of depression and anxiety results from the idea that we aren’t good enough, so we beat up on ourselves relentlessly, thinking perhaps that if we punish ourselves enough, we will grow and eventually attain some goal of perfection or superiority.

But this mind-set is the problem; it is not the cure. Recovery more often results from what I call the Acceptance Paradox–which means the death of the patient’s ego. That means accepting that you are, and always will be, quite flawed, and accepting this with a sense of inner peace, or even humor. In fact, once your ego has died, you can join the Grateful Dead, and that’s incredibly freeing and cool!

 

More later, and sorry to offer you so little in the last couple weeks. I’ve been working hard on the new book, so I’m kind of short on time, but there will be a ton on this topic when the book is released, so hang in there!

Thanks!

David

* Copyright © 2018 by David D. Burns, MD.

Hey, folks, my San Francisco summer intensives is nearly always my BEST training program of the year because the group is quite small, giving you lots of chances for Q and A and schmoozing. In addition, many individuals from my Tuesday group at Stanford join me to provide feedback during the small group exercises. Here are the specifics:

* * *

Coming in San Francisco in August

High Speed, Drug Free Treatment of Depression and Anxiety Disorders–
A Four-Day TEAM-CBT Advanced Intensive

August 6 – 9, 2018, South San Francisco Conference Center, California
For more information, click here
or contact http://www.iahb.org/
phone: 800-258-8411

If you can only attend one of my workshops, consider this intensive! it is simplly

THE BEST!

Seating is limited. Register now  if you want to get in on the action!

Hope to see you in San Francisco in August!

David

David’s Answer to Tuesday Tips #4*

David’s Answer to Tuesday Tips #4*

This was yesterday’s paradoxical tip of the day–

Last week, we discussed the idea that therapists’ empathy skills tend to be poor, but therapists are not usually aware of this. If your patients complete the “Evaluation of Therapy Session” in the waiting room after each session, you’ll see, exactly what’s happening, and you can address alliance failures right away. . .  if you dare!

Failures of the alliance (the patient’s poor ratings of therapist empathy and helpfulness)
are actually extremely positive—
if you know how to respond skillfully!

In fact, you’ll often discover that your greatest therapeutic failures
are your greatest successes in disguise! But how can that be?

And here’s my answer!

Therapists who require their patients to complete my Evaluation of Therapy Session after every session (plus the Brief Mood Survey before and after every session) will be rated on Empathy and Helpfulness Scales, and several other scales that are tremendously sensitive to the tiniest therapeutic errors. You will discover that you often get less than stellar ratings on warmth, trust, understanding, and helpfulness. These low ratings may surprise you, especially if you are used to (wrongly) thinking that your empathy skills are excellent or even outstanding.

I have set the scales up so that even a 1 point deduction from a perfect score on any scale is defined as a failing grade. There are two reasons for this. First, anything less than a perfect rating indicates some dissatisfaction on the part of the patient that needs to be explored. For example, the patient may think you did a super job of using listening skills, but may indicate that you did not completely understand how she or he was feeling inside. If this failure of understanding is not addressed and corrected, it may have a corrosive effect on the treatment.

Without the written feedback on the evaluation scales, the therapist would never know he or she was failing in this way. That’s because if you ask the patient how things are going, he or she will nearly always say, “fine,” and keep his or her dissatisfaction secret. But if you look at the written feedback on the Evaluation of  Therapy Session, you will see right away what’s going on.

So how can it be good to discover that you are failing with your patient? There are several positives:

  1. When therapists use my scales for the first time, most will get failing grades on nearly every scale at nearly ever session with nearly every patient. This can be quite disturbing. But if you learn to process the feedback in a relaxed, non-defensive, warm way, using the Five Secrets of Effective Communication, you will find that your scores will increase dramatically, and your therapeutic skills will soar as well. Many of my students report that after using the scales for several weeks with all their patients, and practicing how to process the information in one of our online or in person training groups, they receive perfect scores on most if not all of the scales with as many as 80% or their patients.
  2. When you learn you are failing with a patient, you can immediately discuss the problem, if you have the courage, and this will can lead to significant improvements in the treatment. That’s because you will have accurate information for the first time on how your patients feel, how much progress they make (or fail to make) in every single session, and how they really feel about you.
  3. When they rate you poorly on warmth, support, trust, or understanding, it will ALWAYS be the case that their negative feedback is 100% accurate. When they say, “You don’t really understand me or care about me,” they are saying something that is true. You ARE failing in that exact way! But if you listen, and disarm, using the Five Secrets, and genuinely and skillfully acknowledge the (often painful) truth in what the patient is telling you, your “failure” will usually become his or her first “success” at getting close to someone. That’s because they patient may have felt rejected or abandoned by everyone in his or her life, so this may be his or her first experience of real intimacy and trust. In other words, the problem the patient experiences with you will usually be his or her “core conflict,” to use a psychoanalytic term.  And if you have the desire and the skill, you can find out about it right away and work to quickly repair the lesion that has been causing so much pain.

This type of communication with patients about their criticisms of the therapist often involves the death of the therapist’s ego. That’s because you have to realize and acknowledge that you really have failed at something you thought you were really good at, something central to your sense of identity. But if you do it skillfully, you and your patient will both “die” at the same time, and you’ll also be reborn with a new sense of connection.

Well, that’s my goofy tip for today. I’m kind of rushed today, so will send it out without much if any editing, and hope it’s not too bad, or too corny!

Thanks!

David

* Copyright © 2018 by David D. Burns, MD.

Coming Soon! Move Fast if You Want to Attend this Terrific Program coming up a week from Sunday!

Sold out in person, but we still have room for you online. Those who attend online will have opportunities for small group practice in break out rooms, with supervision!

High-Speed TEAM-CBT for Depression and Anxiety Disorders 

I warmly invite you to attend this fabulous, one-day workshop by Drs. David Burns and Jill Levitt on Sunday, May 20th, 2018. Click on the link above for registration information.

  • 6 CE Credits
  • The cost is $135
  • You can join in person or online from wherever you live!

You will enjoy learning from David and Jill, working together to bring powerful, healing techniques to life in a clear, step-by-step way. Their teaching style is entertaining, funny, lucid, and inspiring. This is a day you will remember fondly!

In the afternoon, you will have the chance to do some personal healing so you can overcome your own feelings of insecurity and self-doubt. David and Jill promise to bring at least 60% of the audience into a state of spiritual and psychological enlightenment, WITHOUT years of meditation. That’s not a bad deal!

You will leave this workshop with renewed confidence as well as specific, powerful tools that you can use right away to improve your clinical outcomes!

Seating for those who attend live in Palo Alto will be strictly limited, and seats are filling up fast, so move rapidly if you are interested. Online slots are also limited.

Jill and I hope you can join us!

Coming in June! One of my best two-day workshops ever!

“Scared Stiff: Fast, Effective Treatment for Anxiety Disorders”

Sponsored by Jack Hirose & Associates
June 4 -5, 2018 Calgary, Canada
June 6 – 7, 2018 Winnipeg, Canada

You’ll LOVE this workshop and you’ll learn TONS of powerful techniques to treat every type of anxiety:

  • Generalized Anxiety
  • OCD
  • PTSD
  • Phobias
  • Social Anxiety
  • Agoraphobia
  • Panic Disorder
  • and more

You’ll learn how to heal your clients and your own feelings of insecurity and self-doubt as well!

Mike Christensen and several others will be joining me at both locations to help out with supervision of the small group exercises.

 

Solution to David’s Tuesday Tip #3*

Solution to David’s Tuesday Tip #3*

Here’s yesterday’s paradoxical tip #3

Therapists’ perceptions of how patients feel–the severity of symptoms–tend to be extremely inaccurate, at best, but most therapists are not aware of this.

What does this mean? Is it true? And if so, what are the consequences?

Is there a solution to this problem? And what, if anything, does the solution have to do with the first of four “Great Deaths” of the therapists ego?

Here’s Dr. David’s solution

My research and clinical experience have indicated that therapists’ perceptions of how their patients feel, and their patients feel about them, can be (and usually are) extremely inaccurate. What this means, in practical terms, is that a patient may be feeling intensely depressed and even suicidal, and yet the therapist thinks the patient is doing well. Or, the patient may be doing reasonably well, but the therapist thinks he or she is still severely depressed.

This inaccuracy involves all the negative emotions–such as depression, anxiety, and anger–and all the positive emotions as well. But since most therapists do not routinely assess patients’ feelings with brief accurate tests at every session, therapist do no know how “off” their perceptions can sometimes be. And while I do not mean to be alarmist, this can sometimes result in a failure of the therapy, or even the death of a suicidal patient.

In addition, although most therapists feel they are experts at communication, my research and clinical experience have indicated that therapists perceptions of the therapeutic alliance are also typically way off. In addition, many therapists grossly overestimate their clinical and communication skills, but they do not realize this!

To solve this problem, I have developed the Brief Mood Survey (BMS), and require all my patients to complete it in the waiting room before each session begins, and once again after the session is over. The BMS asks patients how depressed, suicidal, anxious, and angry they are feeling “right now,” at the start and end of the session. The comparison of the scores gives therapists an extremely accurate assessment of how effective, or ineffective, the session was.

It is, in a sense, like having an emotional X-ray machine available for the first time. The data are extremely valuable, regardless of whether you are doing psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, or a combination of the two.

At the end of the session, patients also complete the Evaluation of Therapy Session in the waiting, and rate the therapist on empathy, helpfulness, and other important dimensions. This only takes about one or two minutes of the patient’s time and provides the therapist with more invaluable, but potentially shocking, information.

So what does all of this have to do with the first of the four “deaths” of the therapist’s ego? Therapists who use these scales will probably make a number of uncomfortable discoveries, including, but not limited, to these:

  1. Therapists will discover that their perceptions of how their patients feel, and how their patients feel about them, will often be wildly and alarmingly inaccurate.
  2. They will often discover that the session was not at all helpful to the patient–in other words, there was little or no improvement in how the patient felt during the session.
  3. The therapist will likely receive failing grades on the Empathy and Helpfulness Scales most patients at every single session, especially if they are using these scales for the first time.

And that’s what I mean by the “death” of the therapist’s ego. You may discover, to put it in street language, that you suck! It’s happened to me often, and I usually find it painful to discover that my perceptions were off and my efforts were not effective.

But here’s the cool thing. This information can empower you to grow and change your therapeutic approach, so you can begin to deliver true healing. If you review the information with your patients in a warm and open way, it can transform the quality of the therapeutic relationship and vastly boost your effectiveness. And that’s pretty darn cool! I’ve been doing this for forty years, and my patients have proven to be my best teachers–by far!

Well, that’s it for today. Thanks so much for reading this, and if you like my blogs and Feeling Good Podcasts and FB Broadcasts, and the many other free features on my website, www.feelinggood.com, please use your sharing buttons to tell your friends. I am trying to build up my numbers as much as possible, and don’t know a great deal about social media, so anything you can do to spread the word will help.

AND you HAVE BEEN helping a lot already! Last month, (April 2018) my Feeling Good Podcasts with my esteemed host, Dr. Fabrice Nye, had more than 52,000 downloads. That’s a new record for us, so THANK YOU! I’d love to see those numbers soar even higher!

David

* Copyright © 2018 by David D. Burns, MD.

Coming in less than three weeks!

High-Speed TEAM-CBT for Depression and Anxiety Disorders 

I warmly invite you to attend this fabulous, one-day workshop by Drs. David Burns and Jill Levitt on Sunday, May 20th, 2018. Click on the link above for registration information.

  • 6 CE Credits
  • The cost is $135
  • You can join in person or online from wherever you live!

You will enjoy learning from David and Jill, working together to bring powerful, healing techniques to life in a clear, step-by-step way. Their teaching style is entertaining, funny, lucid, and inspiring. This is a day you will remember fondly!

In the afternoon, you will have the chance to do some personal healing so you can overcome your own feelings of insecurity and self-doubt. David and Jill promise to bring at least 60% of the audience into a state of spiritual and psychological enlightenment, WITHOUT years of meditation. That’s not a bad deal!

You will also leave this workshop with renewed confidence as well as specific, powerful tools that you can use right away to improve your clinical outcomes!

You will LOVE this workshop. Seating for those who attend live in Palo Alto will be strictly limited, and seats are filling up fast, so move rapidly if you are interested. Online slots are also limited.

Jill and I hope you can join us!