064: Ask David — Quick Cure for Excessive Worrying?

064: Ask David — Quick Cure for Excessive Worrying?

How would you treat excessive worrying?

In today’s podcast, David and Fabrice address a question submitted by a listener from South Africa named Kevin. He asks how David would treat excessive worrying.

David describes a new patient who had struggled with 53 years of failed therapy for excessive, relentless worrying, and describes how she was “totally and irreversibly cured” in just two therapy sessions, which was the “good news.” The Hidden Emotion Technique was the key to her remarkably rapid recovery. David explains that the “even better news” was that her relentless worrying would come back over and over in the future, and that this was actually a really good thing!

Do you know why? Listen to this podcast you’ll find out!

David also emphasizes the importance of using all the four models, along with a Daily Mood Log, when treating any form of anxiety: the Motivational Model, the Cognitive Model, the Exposure Model, and the Hidden Emotion Model. To learn more about how these four powerful treatment models work, you can listen to Podcasts 022 through #028. Their titles are listed here, or you can link to #022, the first anxiety broadcast, by clicking here.

The DSM5 is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, published by the American Psychiatric Association. It is used to assign diagnoses to patients. David critiques the DSM5  diagnostic criteria for “Generalized Anxiety Disorder” (GAD) and emphasizes that while worrying exists, and can easily be treated in most cases, the “mental disorder” called Generalized Anxiety Disorder does not exist, and is simply a fantasy made up by the psychiatrists who have created the DSM.

Soon, David and Fabrice will launch a series of five podcasts on the Five Secrets of Effective Communication, focusing on one technique each week. Say tuned, because these podcasts could change your life and show you the road to more loving and satisfying relationships with friends, patients, colleagues, and family members–and “enemies” as well!

David and Fabrice love your questions so keep them coming!

Fabrice and I hope you enjoy our Podcasts, and also hope you can leave some positive comments for us and some five star ratings if you like what we’re doing!

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At least one listener has had problems leaving an iTunes review from his i-phone, so Fabrice has created some simple to follow instructions if you need help.

 

063:  Ask David. What’s So Great about Hopelessness or an Addiction? What Does it Take to Be a Worthwhile Human Being?

063: Ask David. What’s So Great about Hopelessness or an Addiction? What Does it Take to Be a Worthwhile Human Being?

Is there anything positive about hopelessness or an addiction ? What does it take to be a “worthwhile” human being, or to have a valuable life?

In today’s podcast, David and Fabrice address three questions submitted by listeners:

  1. Avi asks another great question about the importance of Positive Reframing in TEAM-CBT. But how can we possibly find something positive in the feeling of hopelessness. After all, Dr. Aaron Beck has taught us that it’s the worst emotion of all!
  2. Avi asks a similar question about an addiction. How can an addiction possibly be a good thing?
  3. Eugene asks a tremendous question about a passage in Dr. Burns’ book, Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy, on the topic of what it means to be a worthwhile human being, and what it takes to make a life valuable. Eugene hints that Dr. Burns may have the wrong idea, and asks what he would say to a patient who doesn’t “cry uncle!”

David and Fabrice love your questions so keep them coming!

Fabrice and I hope you enjoy our Podcasts, and also hope you can leave some positive comments for us and some five star ratings if you like what we’re doing!

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At least one listener has had problems leaving an iTunes review from his i-phone, so Fabrice has created some simple to follow instructions if you need help.

062:  Ask David. Five Secrets of Effective Communication / Psychotherapy Homework

062: Ask David. Five Secrets of Effective Communication / Psychotherapy Homework

Will people manipulate you if they catch on to the fact that you’re using the Five Secrets of Effective Communication? Is it fair to ask depressed patients to do psychotherapy homework between sessions when they’re already struggling with a loss of motivation?

In today’s podcast, David and Fabrice address two questions submitted by listeners:

  1. Robert asks whether it would be a problem if you are using the Five Secrets of Effective Communication (the Disarming Technique, Thought and Feeling Empathy, Inquiry, “I Feel” Statements, and Stroking) with someone who is already familiar with these techniques. Isn’t there a danger that they might see through you and  therefore thwart your efforts and manipulate you?
  2. Avi asks about the importance of psychotherapy homework in TEAM-CBT. He points out that the loss of motivation is one of the central symptoms of depression, so aren’t we in a catch 22 type of situation since patients might not have the strength and perseverance to do their homework?

David and Fabrice love your questions so keep them coming!

Fabrice and I hope you enjoy our Podcasts, and also hope you can leave some positive comments for us and some five star ratings if you like what we’re doing!

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At least one listener has had problems leaving an iTunes review from his i-phone, so Fabrice has created some simple to follow instructions if you need help.

I Goofed!

I Goofed!

 

Sorry, I hit the publish button prematurely for the Monday Podcast. It will come on Monday as scheduled! I apologize for any confusion or inconvenience, as I had to temporarily “un-publish” it. I am still a bit of a novice at the use of social media, but learning as fast as I can! David

Fabrice and I hope you enjoy our Podcasts, and also hope you can leave some positive comments for us and some five star ratings if you like what we’re doing!

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At least one listener has had problems leaving an iTunes review from his i-phone, so Fabrice has created some simple to follow instructions if you need help.

How to Leave an iTunes Review of the Feeling Good Podcasts

How to Leave an iTunes Review of the Feeling Good Podcasts

Hi feelinggood.com visitors,

At least one listener has had problems leaving an iTunes review for our Feeling Good Podcasts. Fabrice has created some simple to follow instructions if you need help on this.

Fabrice and I hope you enjoy our Podcasts, and also hope you can leave some positive comments for us and some additional five star ratings. I think we’ve gotten all or nearly all five star ratings so far. If you are ever upset by anything we broadcast, feel free to email me with your concerns!

Fabrice and I will be recording a special series on the Five Secrets of Effective Communication tomorrow morning. We plan to publish these podcasts soon. They will include applications for therapists who want to improve their empathy skills with challenging patients / clients, as well as applications for all of us so we can improve our relationships with friends, family members, and colleagues.

We will feature one of the five techniques each week, with “assignments” for you so you can work on each technique for a week, and then the next week you can work on another technique between podcasts. I think it will be fun and interesting for you! The Five Secrets seem simple, but they actually require quite a lot of commitment and practice if you want to get good at using them. In addition, when you use them, you have to speak from the heart, in a genuine way. If you use them as techniques to try to manipulate someone, they will not be effective in most cases.

I’ve had a ton of great questions from all of you recently, so we’ll probably have some more “Ask David” Podcasts. In addition, I’ll be answering questions on my live FB “radio show” which has been moved to 3 PM west coast time. Feel free to join us on FB on Sundays!

Thanks,

David

If you are reading this blog on social media, I appreciate it! I would like to invite you to visit my website, http://www.FeelingGood.com, as well. There you will find a wealth of free goodies, including my Feeling Good blogs, my Feeling Good Podcasts with host, Dr. Fabrice Nye, and the Ask Dr. David blogs as well, along with announcements of upcoming workshops, and tons of resources for mental health professionals as well as patients!

Once you link to my blog, you can sign up using the widget at the top of the column to the right of each page. Please forward my blogs to friends as well, especially anyone with an interest in mood problems, psychotherapy, or relationship conflicts.

Thanks! David

061:  Ask David! What Causes Depression and Anxiety?

061: Ask David! What Causes Depression and Anxiety?

Podcast 61, David and Fabrice answer your questions

In today’s podcast, David and Fabrice address a number of excellent questions submitted by listeners:

  1. Are the scales on your Brief Mood Survey reliable and valid?
  2. How can I identify my Negative Thoughts when I’m upset but I can’t figure out what I’m thinking and telling myself?
  3. I have social anxiety and don’t want to get out of bed. I’d rather just lie in bed and watch Game of Thrones. Help me! What should I do?
  4. I saw an article in the paper that claimed that bacteria in the gut cause anxiety. Is this true? If not, what does cause depression and anxiety?
  5. Could your tools, like the Cost-Benefit Analysis, help with problems that aren’t necessarily emotional problems? Like what career to pursue, or what college to go to?
  6. What should you do if you feel great at the end of a therapy session, and then become severely upset again during the week?
  7. How does Dr. Burns deal with resistance from colleagues when he is trying to teach these new TEAM-CBT techniques? Does he run into much resistance? How does he feel about the resistance?

David and Fabrice love your questions so keep them coming!

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060:  Self-Monitoring: A New Cure for OCD or PseudoBulbar Palsy?

060: Self-Monitoring: A New Cure for OCD or PseudoBulbar Palsy?

Podcast 60, How could psychotherapy possibly help someone if their depression results from a chemical imbalance in the brain?

In today’s podcast, David and Fabrice return to their original goal of documenting David’s list of “50 Ways to Untwists Your Thinking.” These are the methods David has learned, created, or refined to combat the negative thoughts that trigger depression, anxiety, and anger, as well as the positive thoughts that trigger habits and addictions. Today, they focus on one of the more obscure methods called “Self-Monitoring.”

David describes how “Self-Monitoring” works. He thinks of it as “Meditation in Daily Life.” The whole idea is to note a negative thought that suddenly pops into your mind, and then to track it, or count it, with some type of counting device, like the wrist counters golfers wear to keep track of their scores. Then you can simply let go of the thought and continue with what you were doing, instead of dwelling on the thought and getting distracted and upset.

David explains that most of the time Self-Monitoring is not very effective, but occasionally it can be extremely helpful or even life changing. He describes an eye doctor who was incapacitated with severe OCD who recovered completely after just four weeks of Self-Monitoring in combination with Response Prevention.

David also describes how this technique, along with the Daily Mood Log, was curative for a retired carpenter with severe depression following a stroke. The type of stroke is called “Pseudo Bulbar Palsy,” and the symptoms include uncontrollable sobbing or laughing after the slightest sad or funny event or comment. In this case, the man’s depression was the clear result of brain damage.

This case was particularly interesting because the therapist for the carpenter was one of David’s students, a clinical psychologist who had raised the question, “How could cognitive therapy possibly help someone if his or her depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain?” Since she knew the carpenter’s depression was caused by thousands of microscopic hemorrhages in the deep structures of his brain, she did not see how any kind of psychotherapy could possibly help.

What do you think about this. Listen to this podcast, and you’ll discover the surprising answer!

At the end, David and Fabrice discuss the critical importance of quantitative feedback, for therapists and patients alike, as well as the role of “feedback loops” in our daily lives.

If you would like us to schedule a podcast on any of the “50 Ways to Untwist Your Thinking,” please send us a comment below or email us and we will schedule a podcast on it if we have not yet done that!

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